What’s On » Festival Debate Stages

FESTIVAL DEBATE STAGES

We’re bringing together a great group of brilliant thinkers and practitioners from the region and beyond to stimulate debate, discussion and inspirational thinking over the 2 days of the festival.

They’ll be appearing on our debate stages which will be at the heart of the festival, connecting thinking, ideas and creativity from all the other learning zones, performance spaces and conversation corners and giving everyone a chance to have their voice heard.

The debates will be looking at our challenges and celebrating how they are being addressed in our region. Some of the key questions for all festivalgoers include: How do we ensure our schools and Early Years settings are great places to learn and to work? How can we get our education organisations working together across boundaries? What’s technology doing for and to young people? How do we enable our young people to realise their potential at and beyond school? How do we save the arts/cultural curriculum?  What’s happening in STEM, now and in the future? How are we engaging education with employment? How do we get evidence-informed education within all schools and settings? There are of course many more questions that colleagues will bring.

Friday 14th June

Speakers:
Professor Chris Husbands, Vice Chancellor, Sheffield Hallam University
Ann Mroz, Editor TES
Dan Jarvis MP, Mayor of the Sheffield City Region

Synopsis:
Colleagues set the scene for the festival

Speakers:
Hywel Roberts, Author and Consultant
Gwyn Ap Harri, CEO XP School Doncaster
Jonny Uttley, CEO Education Alliance
Sue O’Brien, Partnerships for Attainment Lead, South Yorkshire Futures
Sameena Choudry, Co-founder (WomenEd) and Founder (Equitable Education)

Focus:
If we’re serious about making a difference to teacher recruitment and retention then we need to look closely at the environments in which teachers work. At the Festival we want to talk head on about what makes schools great places to work. We know that for many teachers schools are great places and we want to celebrate that.

We want to celebrate where great practice exists, getting under the skin of this from a number of angles, we also want to challenge ourselves to think about it more deeply. Everyone who works in schools will have a view on this. What we do know is that there isn’t one correct answer. a variety of prominent speakers from a range of organisations and experiences will begin this debate on the headline stage. We hope everyone involved will then take up the conversation This is something everyone should be talking about.

Speakers:

Ed Dorrell – Deputy Editor TES
John Edwards – Regional Schools Commissioner for East Midlands and the Humber
Tom Banham – Chair of the South Yorkshire Teaching Schools network
Steph Douglas – Head of Early Intervention and Localities,
Doncaster Borough Council
Nicola Shipman – CEO, Steel City Schools Partnership
Dave Sutton – CEO , Maltby Learning Trust

Focus:

The nature of educational challenges faced in our region and in others are often beyond any one organisation to address successfully. This question-time session will look at the role of schools and other organisations in our area in developing a shared approach to identifying and meeting priorities across our local boundaries.

The session will be chaired by Ed Dorrell with the panel considering questions that illustrate key local challenges and how they might collectively be overcome.

Speakers:

Sir Tim Brighouse, Consultant
Rt. Hon David Laws, Educational Policy Institute
Amatey Doku, Vice President, National Union of Students
The Rt. Hon, the Baroness Estelle Morris, House of Lords
Professor Nicola Ingram, Sheffield Hallam University

Focus:

Social Mobility is like trying to run up a ‘down escalator’ for so long as we fail to tackle the many practices in and out of school which reinforce barriers to equal opportunity.

The session will start with a short key note input from Sir Tim Brighouse setting out historical context, tensions, educational practice that support or hinder social mobility. A short briefing paper will be shared in advance of the session. Panel members will respond to the key note and bring their own perspective. Sir Tim will then open up a panel discussion.

Speakers:

Tracey Brabin MP, Shadow Minister for Early Years
Sally Pearse, Principal Lecturer Sheffield Institute of Education
Jan Dubiel, Consultant Early Excellence
Lydia Cuddy-Gibbs, Head of EYFS, ARK
Helen Moylett, Early Education Vice President and Associate
Ruth Swailes, School Improvement Advisor and Education Consultant

Focus:

In a fragmented and challenged sector what can we come together and agree on as the key priorities to ensure that young children get the quality early years services they deserve.

Speakers:

The Rt. Hon. the Lord Blunkett
Louisa Harrison Walker, Benchmark Recruitment and Chair of Chamber of Commerce Council
Nick Bowen, Executive Principal Horizon Community College
Dr Elnaz Kashefpakdel, Education and Employers

Focus:

Only 40% of schools currently provide employer encounters, young people are 86% less likely to be unemployed if they have 4 or more employer encounters and 60% of businesses believe that school leavers lack the skills to succeed in work….the evidence is compelling about the importance of employer encounters and engagement to support young people in understanding and achieving their aspirations.

The Gatsby benchmarks of Good Career Guidance show clear best practice relating to employer engagement and workplace encounters, but why are so many young people not getting the access to employers, workplace experiences, role models and skills development that will support them to achieve?

This panel discusses the importance of bridging the gap between education and employers and enables delegates to discuss some of the challenges or share models of best practice in achieving our ambitions of effective collaborative practice between employers and education.

Speakers:

Emily Perry, Deputy Head of the Centre for Development and Research in Education, Sheffield Institute of Education
Paul Andrews, Programme Manager Education, Royal Society of Chemistry
Mark Boylan, Professor of Education, Sheffield Institute of Education
Nan Davies, Programme Manager Professional Development, Education and Learning, the Wellcome Trust
Gemma Payne, Teacher CPD Policy Lead, Department of Education
Shaun Reason, Chief Executive, Association for Science Education

Focus:

Professional development plays a vital role in teachers’ careers; it supports teachers to understand their practice and improves wellbeing and retention, especially for teachers in shortage subjects like science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

In this session we will explore the purpose, practicalities and potential of professional development for teachers of STEM subjects. Our speakers will look across the phases, considering examples of professional development from their own and other organisations. We will reflect on the challenges and benefits of the current situation, and look into the future to imagine how professional development might be in years to come.

Short inputs from each speaker will be followed by discussion and questions from the audience. The session will be chaired by Emily Perry, Sheffield Institute of Education.

Speakers:

David Owen , Head of Department, Sheffield Institute of Education
Chris French, CEO Mercia Learning Trust
David Whitaker, Executive Principal Wellspring Academy Trust
Mark Lehain , Director of Parents and Teachers for Excellence
Julie Harmison, Co Director Trauma Informed Schools UK
Helen O’Donnell, CEO Children’s University Trust

Focus:

Is there consensus around what makes for excellent teaching and learning? Why do schools and other educational settings vary so much in the practices they promote? Isn’t all education ‘knowledge rich’? What does an inclusive curriculum look like?

This debate will address these questions through engaging with experts from across the spectrum of educational practice, with a focus on their innovation, instruction, inquiry and inclusion.

Speakers:

Anne Longfield OBE. Children’s Commissioner for England
Nancy Fielder, Editor of The Star, Sheffield Telegraph and Doncaster Free Press.

Focus:

Anne Longfield OBE, the Children’s Commissioner for England, has a legal duty to promote and protect the rights of all children in England with a particular focus on children and young people who are in or leaving care, living away from home or receiving social care services. Anne will speak to Nancy Fielder, Editor of The Star, Sheffield Telegraph and Doncaster Free Press, about the growing problem of children in the North too often being left behind, especially those from the poorest backgrounds – and what can be done to challenge this complex issue.

Saturday 15th June

Speakers:
Ros Wilson

Synopsis:
The inimitable Ros Wilson provides her fascinating, insightful and funny insights into the world of education.

Speakers:

Dame Alison Peacock. CEO Chartered College of Teaching
Matt Hood. CEO Ambition Institute
Ian Read, Head Teacher Watercliffe Meadow, Sheffield
Professor Sam Twiselton OBE, Sheffield Institute of Education

Focus:

If we’re serious about making a difference to teacher recruitment and retention then we need to look closely at the environments in which teachers work. At the Festival we want to talk head on about what makes schools great places to work. We know that for many teachers schools are great places and we want to celebrate that.

We want to celebrate where great practice exists, getting under the skin of this from a number of angles, we also want to challenge ourselves to think about it more deeply. Everyone who works in schools will have a view on this. What we do know is that there isn’t one correct answer. a variety of prominent speakers from a range of organisations and experiences will begin this debate on the headline stage. We hope everyone involved will then take up the conversation This is something everyone should be talking about.

Speakers:

Margaret Mullholland , Director, Swiss Cottage Teaching School
Chris Rossiter, CEO Driver Youth Trust
Nick Hodge, Professor of Inclusive Practice, Sheffield Institute of Education
Dave Whitaker, Executive Principal, Wellspring Academy Trust

Focus:

The policy environment for the wellbeing of children and young people with SEND is in a state of flux. The panel of highly experienced colleagues from the special school and wider education sector will be discussing issues of concern for both policy and practice.

Speakers:

Penny Rabiger, Co-Founder, BAMEed
Sameena Choudry, Co-Founder, WomenEd
Hannah Jepson, Co-Founder, LGBTed
Amjad Ali, Co-founder of BAMEed

Focus:

Representation and diversity are often addressed in terms of specific characteristics that do not take the reality and complexity of individuals into account. This session with colleagues from WomenEd, LGBTed and BAMEed will consider key issues that education settings should take into account when providing a safe, supportive and developmental environment for all their staff.

Speakers:

Dr Stuart Bevins, Principal Research Fellow, Sheffield Institute of Education
Richard Needham, Association for Science Education
Geoff Mackey, Sustainability Development and Communications Director, BASF
Heather Wain, Head of Academic Development, Sheffield Institute of Education
Jeremy Carter, Secondary Science Teacher, Sheffield High School
Louise Stubberfield, Primary Science Lead, Wellcome Trust

Focus:

‘STEM’ is an acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. However, when you peel the first layer of meaning away, you reveal an elaborate conundrum in the education world. If you ask 10 different science, mathematics, technology and engineering teachers to define STEM you will receive a very different answer from each. The ideal may be a holistic, coherent group of subjects but many of us appear to consider STEM as a binary compound that consists of science and mathematics with technology and engineering barely ‘integrated’ through limited interventions.

In this session we will explore the origins and nature of STEM education, it’s purposes, and opportunities, and consider whether or not a true STEM education can exist as an integrated approach to teaching and learning multiple subject disciplines.